Southern Methodist University

PO Box 750117

Dallas, TX 75275

 

(214) 768-4936 (office)

(817) 903-3000 (mobile)

brown@smu.edu

 

   Chelsea Brown, Ph.D.

Education

University of North Texas                                                     May 2008

Doctor of Philosophy

Major Field: Comparative Political Economy

Minor Fields: Econometrics and International Relations

Dissertation Title: The Road to Development is Paved With Good Institutions: The Political and Economic Implications of Financial Markets

 

Ecole Supérieure de Commerce de Dijon                        October 2002

Master of Science

Major Field: Finance

 

Texas Christian University                                                    May 2002

Master of Business Administration

Major Field: Management

 

University of North Texas                                                     May 2000

Bachelor of Arts

Major Field: Political Science

Minor Field: French

Experience

Southern Methodist University (Texas)                    Fall 2007 - Present

Post-Doctoral Fellow

Foreign Agricultural Service (Moscow, Russia)                 Spring 2007

International Agriculture Short-term Contract

University of Canterbury (New Zealand)             Spring 2006/ Jan 2007

Visiting Lecturer

International Studies Quarterly (ISQ)                                  2003-2006

Editorial Assistant

University of North Texas                                                     2002-2003

Research Assistant

Texas Christian University                                                   2000-2001

Graduate Assistant

Additional Training

Texas A and M University                                                January 2004

Winter Institute in Foreign Policy: International Mediation and Negotiation.

Texas A and M University                                                January 2003

Winter Institute in Foreign Policy: Mathematical Modeling

Akademia Ekonomiczna (Krakow, Poland)                              July 2002

Summer Program in Political Economy: The Economics of Transition

 

Publications

 

Peer Reviewed Articles

  • Brown, Chelsea. forthcoming 2009. “Pursuing Development in the Era of Free Trade: Designing Post-Washington Consensus Institutions,” The Law and Business Review of the Americas.

 

  • Meernik, James and Chelsea Brown. 2007. “The Short Path and the Long Road: Explaining the Duration of United States Military Operations,” The Journal of Peace Research. 44(1)

 

Book Chapters

  • Brown, Chelsea. 2007. “The 1972 Burundi Genocide.” In Civil Wars of the World: Major Conflicts Since World War II, eds. Karl DeRouen and Uk Heo. Denver, ABL-CLIO.

 

Under Review

  • Brown, Chelsea.  “Democracy and the IMF: The Effects of Structural Reforms,” Revise and resubmit at the International Political Science Review.

 

Conference Presentations

 

  • “Financial Markets and the Incidence of Civil War” To be presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston, MA August 28, 2008.

 

  • “Finance and Human Rights: Do Better Financial Markets Add Up to Better Human Rights Protection?” (with student Bahar Dave).  To be presented at the Peace Science Society North American Meeting, Claremont, CA October 24-26, 2008.

 

  • “Integration and Institutional Reform: Should the Washington Consensus Be Revived?” Paper presented at the Free Trade of the Americas: Can the Washington Consensus be Revived? Conference sponsored by the Jno Owens Foundation, Dallas, TX April 11, 2008.

 

  • “Markets, States and Development: The Political Implications of Financial Markets” Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago, IL August 30-September 2, 2007.

 

  • “International Bond Rates and Political Events: A Time Series Analysis” Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, IL April 15-17, 2004.

 

  • “Democracy and the IMF: A Closer Look at the Effects of Structural Adjustment” Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Western Political Science Association, Portland, OR March 12, 2004.

 

 

Works in Progress

 

  • “Making Markets Work: An Institutional Approach” How are the incentives for state and market actors affected by different financial market institutions and arrangements? This project attempts to unpack the effects of various regulatory institutions, both public and private, associated with financial market depth. From this, the most promising targets for development policy can be identified.

 

  • “Market Competition, Political Opposition?” This paper presents evidence that improving access to credit may improve the distribution of economic and intellectual resources in a society, and thereby contribute to the incentives and ability to participate in politics.

  • “Breaking the Corruption Cycle” Does improving financial market development improve corruption or provide even more opportunity for graft?  In this paper, I discuss how improved information creates greater demand for government transparency and accountability, and provide empirical evidence to support this idea.

  • "Civil Conflict and Financial Development"   Does financial market development affects the incidence and duration of civil conflict?  Financial market development decreases the level of poverty and redistributes power away from the elites to the lower and middle classes.  Theoretically, the improved economic situation and weakened elite structure could resolve some of the grievances that motivate rebellion in the first place.  This may also raise the cost of rebellion, as potential rebels have more to lose under such a scenario. My results show that an increase in financial development strongly decreases the probability that a conflict will occur, but does not substantially lower the duration of conflict once it begins.

 

  • “Financial Jihad” What are the potential implications of the increasing prevalence of Islamic financial regimes on the international system.  I discuss several Islamic financial instruments, assess the effects of their growth, and examine the role of Islamic finance in international regulatory regimes.

 

 

Courses Taught

 

International Political Economy

Seminar on Civil Conflict

European Politics

Globalization

International Organizations

Introduction to International Relations

Model United Nations

American Politics

 

Policy Interests

 

Accountability of International Institutions

Financial Market Development

International Development

International Financial Governance

Islamic Finance

The Role of the State in the Market

 

 

 

Department and University Service

 

2007-2009 Faculty Advisor for the International Relations Council

2007-2009 Faculty Advisor for the Model UN Program

2004-2005 Graduate Liaison for Academic Affairs

2003-2005 Chair, Finance Committee, University Union

2003-2005 Voting Member, University Union Board of Directors

2004-2005 Student Service Fee Committee Member

2003-2004 Vice President, Graduate Student Council

2001-2002 Public Relations Director, Executive Women’s Forum

 

Honors and Awards

 

2008 HOPE Award for Teaching Excellence

2005-2006 Mary D. Walsh Endowed Scholarship Recipient

2003-2005 Political Science Departmental Scholarship Recipient

2003-2004 Graduate Student Council Scholarship Recipient

2004 Raupe Scholarship Winner

2004 Graduate School Travel Scholarship Winner

 

Languages

 

English (native)

French (good)

German (intermediate)

Russian (basic)

 

References

 

Dr. John Booth

Department of Political Science

University of North Texas

PO Box 305340

Denton, TX 76203

(940) 565-2684

booth@unt.edu

 

Dr. Jim Hollifield

John G. Tower Center for Political Studies

Southern Methodist University

PO Box 750117

Dallas, TX 750117

(214) 768-2825

jhollifi@smu.edu

 

Dr. Alex Tan

Department of Political Science

University of Canterbury

Private Bag 4800

Christchurch 8020, New Zealand

(03) 3-364-2987

alex.tan@canterbury.ac.nz